Kansas Highway Patrol Asking For Public Input Regarding Tattoo Policy

The Kansas Highway Patrol is short in manpower statewide. In addressing this shortage, the agency is exploring ways of attracting more applicants for its trooper and other vacant positions. As an agency with a background of history and tradition, the agency has a tattoo policy, and as we move into 21st century policing, the Patrol is interested in what the public has to say or their thoughts on tattoos in law enforcement.

Currently the Patrol’s tattoo policy automatically disqualifies law enforcement officer candidates from the application process for having:

  • Any offensive tattoo, scarification or brand, regardless of location on the body.
  • Any tattoo, scarification or brand that would be visible when wearing an agency provided uniform or required work attire. Any such marking(s) appearing on the head, face, neck, hands, or arms (below the bottom of the bicep). (As a general rule, any marking(s) visible when wearing a short-sleeved v-neck shirt.)

There is a brief survey on Google Forms that the Patrol is asking community members and those in the public to fill out. The survey is short, but will provide the Patrol with valuable information. The survey will be open from Friday, January 8, 2016 through Friday, January 29, 2016. We value your input and look forward to hearing the responses. The Kansas Highway Patrol takes great pride in the quality of the candidates which we attract for the agency and our continued commitment is to providing SERVICE-COURTESY-PROTECTION to the citizens of the State of Kansas.

PUBLIC SURVEY: http://goo.gl/forms/vyf3JAkwDL

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Derek Nester
Derek Nester was born and raised in Blue Rapids, and graduated from Valley Heights High School in May of 2000. He attended Cowley College in Arkansas City and Johnson County Community College in Overland Park studying Journalism & Media Communication. After stops at KFRM and KCLY radio in Clay Center, he joined KNDY in 2002 as a board operator and play by play announcer. Derek is now responsible for the digital content of Dierking Communications, Inc. six radio stations. In 2005 Derek joined the staff of KCFX radio in Kansas City as a production coordinator for the Kansas City Chiefs Radio Network, which airs on over 70 radio stations across 12 Midwest states and growing.